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Selasa, 05 April 2011

Future Perfect Continuous Tense

Future Perfect Continuous has two different forms: "will have been doing " and "be going to have been doing." Unlike Simple Future forms, Future Perfect Continuous forms are usually interchangeable.

FORM Future Perfect Continuous with "Will"

[will have been + present participle]
Examples:
  • You will have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.
  • Will you have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives?
  • You will not have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.

FORM Future Perfect Continuous with "Be Going To"

[am/is/are + going to have been + present participle]
Examples:
  • You are going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.
  • Are you going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives?
  • You are not going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.
copied from: english page

Future Perfect Tense

Future Perfect has two different forms: "will have done" and "be going to have done." Unlike Simple Futureforms, Future Perfect forms are usually interchangeable.

FORM Future Perfect with "Will"

[will have + past participle]
Examples:
  • You will have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.
  • Will you have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.?
  • You will not have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.

FORM Future Perfect with "Be Going To"

[am/is/are + going to have + past participle]
Examples:
  • You are going to have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.
  • Are you going to have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.?
  • You are not going to have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.
copied from: english page

Future Continuous Tense

Future Continuous has two different forms: "will be doing " and "be going to be doing." Unlike Simple Futureforms, Future Continuous forms are usually interchangeable.

FORM Future Continuous with "Will"

[will be + present participle]
Examples:
  • You will be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.
  • Will you be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight?
  • You will not be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

FORM Future Continuous with "Be Going To "

[am/is/are + going to be + present participle]
Examples:
  • You are going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.
  • Are you going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight?
  • You are not going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.
copied from: english page

Simple Future Tense

Simple Future has two different forms in English: "will" and "be going to." Although the two forms can sometimes be used interchangeably, they often express two very different meanings. These different meanings might seem too abstract at first, but with time and practice, the differences will become clear. Both "will" and "be going to" refer to a specific time in the future.


FORM Will

[will + verb]
Examples:
  • You will help him later.
  • Will you help him later?
  • You will not help him later.

FORM Be Going To

[am/is/are + going to + verb]
Examples:
  • You are going to meet Jane tonight.
  • Are you going to meet Jane tonight?
  • You are not going to meet Jane tonight.
copied from: english page

Minggu, 03 April 2011

Lesson Plan

"A lesson plan is a teacher's detailed description of the course of instruction for an individual lesson. A daily lesson plan is developed by a teacher to guide class instruction. Planning the material is much more difficult than delivering the lessons." (wikipedia).


As a teacher, you'll need a lesson plan to develop your class.


If you want to see an example of lesson plan that is written in English, click here

Verb + -ing




Examples:

I enjoy swimming (not 'I enjoy to swim')

Would you mind closing the window? (not 'would you mind to close the window?')


 

After these verbs, you have to add –ing behind it:

StopEverybody stopped talking. There was silence
DelayThe plane delayed flying because hard rain
FancyI fancy going to the café this night
ConsiderI consider reading book now.
Admit
MissI miss ringing her.
Involve
FinishI've finished cleaning the flat
Postpone
ImagineI imagine driving ferrari
AvoidHe tried to avoid answering my question
Deny
Risk
Practise

 

Note the negative form not –ing:

When I'm holiday, I enjoy not having to get up early.


 

We also use –ing after:

Give up = (stop)Mimien has given up smoking
Put off = (postpone)
Carry on / go on = (continue)We can't go on living like this
Keep / keep on = (do something continuously or repeatedly)Don't keep interrupting me while I'm speaking

 

Used to (do)

Mimien stopped smoking two years ago. He doesn't smoke anymore. But he used to smoke. He used to smoke for about 20 cigarettes a day.

"He used to smoke" means he smoked regularly for some time in the past, but he doesn't smoke anymore right now. He was a smoker, but now, He quit.

I used to do something on the past. There is no present form. You can not say 'I use to do'. To talk about the present, use present simple (I do).

        

Past

he used to smoke

we used to live

There used to be

Present

he smokes

we live

there is

                    

We used to live in a small village but now we live in Jakarta.

There used to be four cinemas in the town. Now there is only one.

The normal question form is did (you) used to…?

Did you used to eat some fruits and vegetables when you were child?

The negative form is didn't use to… or used not no

I didn't use to like her. OR I used not to like her.